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Visit to London Goldsmith's Fair 2015


September 27 today and I find myself at a completely different environment, than yesterday at London Tattoo Convention.

Everything look classy and serious, without unnecessary fuss at every entrance. I was asked to leave my bag at the cloakroom, admittedly I am not accustomed to such formalities.



I am in the Goldsmiths Fair. For 32 years, Goldsmiths’ Fair has been staged in the opulent surroundings of Goldsmiths’ Hall, built in 1839. Its sumptuous interiors provide an inspiring backdrop for the display of innovative contemporary design.

Goldsmiths’ Hall is used regularly as a film location, often posing as Buckingham Palace on screen. Recent high profile productions have included London Fashion Week shows, Downton Abbey, Sherlock Holmes, The Face and American sitcom, The Royals.

I make my first steps in the building and I am already stunned by the luxurious interior. Immediately I started thinking that I am underdressed for this occasssion and I'm trying to remember the basic rules of savoi vivre .



Anyway, Goldsmiths’ Fair is the ultimate one-stop destination for those seeking out jewellery and silver by the most exciting independent designer-makers in the UK. I'm here to see works of the greatest jewelry makers of nowadays. And as I soon discovered, the industrial designers for decorative objects are here as well.

Although I've noticed a Greek name at the exhibition, personally I come across one name that is well known to me - the one of a German designer Silvia Weidenbach. She was a gues star at the 3D printing exhibition in Athens in January 2015 at the Onassis Cultural Centre which I happened to visit.

The exhibition is divided into 2 parts, the first part ends today and the second one will start on 29th of September.



I couldn't resist but take a photo together with Silvia...

As I learn later on Silvia Weidenbach was announced winner of the Goldsmiths’ Fair 2015 (Part One) Best New Design Award by Crafts Council trustee and prize judge Peter Ting. Weidenbach’s work is a marriage of traditional goldsmithing and silversmithing techniques and digital craft.

Diamonds are entirely set by hand as well as much of the silver-plated ruthenium encasings whilst high quality nylon incorporates the latest technologies. Ideas turn into rough sketches, which then become 3D digital Freeform drawings using a haptic arm. Further high-tech comes into play via Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), which turns nylon powder into three-dimensional forms that are later hand-dyed.